Tutorial 1 – Co-Simulation of Cyber Physical Energy Systems – From Black-Box Model Exchange to Design of Experiments

The aim of the tutorial is to offer attendees the basics of co-simulation with examples of applications in ICT-driven Smart Grid analysis. Co-Simulation based approaches should be utilized to develop, test and verify paradigms for next generation monitoring, control and operation of energy systems. The co-simulation approach usually involves the integration of two or more simulators to capture the cyber physical dependency of a process.

Background

The complexity of future Smart Grids stems from the multiplicity of interacting players that operate with, and within, a defined (yet dynamic and open) environment as independent decision-makers, with autonomous behaviours, goals and attitudes (e.g. focussing on grid stability, energy efficiency or demand-supply-matching). The actors perform actions via distributed decision making processes – partially taking into account limited forecasts – which impact the physically constrained network via diverse information and communication technology (ICT) systems and means (from data acquisition to control and command systems). Hence, ICT is no-longer an add-on to the power system but an enabling technology. Co-simulation refers to the simultaneous simulation of power delivery and communications networks together with other aspects potentially relevant for the dynamics of future energy systems (e.g. weather, markets, social systems).

At the time of this writing, each aspect/function is typically simulated separately with each study often assuming that the other works perfectly. Obviously, this cannot always be the case. For example, a storm that disables part of the power grid may likewise destroy part of the communications system. Another example is latency in the control sampling and communications that can adversely impact the expected behaviour of the power system, if the control and communications scheme is not correctly planned. Extending the scope, markets play an important role in residential as well as industrial demand response scenarios, the latter often being influenced by social group interaction making it harder to precisely predict the systems behaviour.

Simulations capturing the operation and interactions of all those systems are necessary – to some extent – in order to fully assess the potential reliability benefits and impacts of future Smart Grids. Interactive simulation utilizing existing distribution and cyber simulation platforms, or co-simulation, is a potential avenue for performing such integrated studies.

Aim of the tutorial

Co-Simulation based approaches should be utilized to develop, test and verify paradigms for next generation monitoring, control and operation of energy systems. The co-simulation approach usually involves the integration of two or more simulators to capture the cyber physical dependency of a process. The aim of the tutorial is to offer attendees the basics of co-simulation with examples of applications in ICT-driven Smart Grid analysis.

Content

  1. Modelling of complex cyber-physical systems: concepts and methods (Peter Palensky, TU Delft)
  2. Scenario Design of Smart Grid Co-Simulations (Sebastian Lehnhoff, University of Oldenburg)

Registration

The tutorial is provided free of charge for IEEE ENERGYCON 2016 registered participants. Please register for participation online at http://www.conftool.com/energycon2016.

Participants that have already registered for the conference, but not for the tutorial can add the tutorial to their registration: https://www.conftool.com/energycon2016/index.php?page=editParticipant.

Speakers

Peter Palensky Peter Palensky is a full Professor for intelligent electric power grids at TU Delft, Netherlands, and Principal Scientist for Complex Energy Systems at the Austrian Institute of Technology (AIT) / Energy Department, Austria. Before that he was Head of Business Unit “Sustainable Building Technologies” at the AIT, CTO of Envidatec Corp., Hamburg, Germany, associate Professor at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University Assistant at the Vienna University of Technology, Austria, and researcher at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California. He is active in international committees like ISO, IEEE and CEN, and is associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics. His main research field is complex energy systems.
Sebastian Lehnhoff Sebastian Lehnhoff is a full Professor for Energy Information Systems at the University of Oldenburg. He received his doctorate at the TU Dortmund University in 2009. Prof. Lehnhoff is a member of the executive board of the Energy R&D division at the OFFIS Institute for Information Technology. He is speaker of the special interest group „Energy Information Systems“ within the German Informatics Society (GI), assoc. editor of the IEEE Computer Society’s Computing and Smart Grid Special Technical Community as well as an active member of numerous committees and working groups focusing on ICT in future Smart Grids. His main research field is control of complex socio-technical energy systems as well as appropriate methods for co-simulation and design of experiments. Prof. Lehnhoff is author of more than 100 papers, published in international journals or presented in national and international conferences.